Bad Stock Pick #3: Trican Well Service(TCW)

The stock price of Canadian energy, gas and oil stocks were said to be low. A BNN Guest, Eric Nutall, one who may be perceived as a stock expert in this field had been recommending Trican Well Service for months even as the stock price kept falling. To him it was ridiculous how low many of these stocks in the sector were.

Because I had just clocked in some easy money I thought I’d foolishly put it to work. Since Eric was so adamant about Trican’s outlook I decided to pick up some shares. It sounds like I’m blaming him but it’s more that I’m disappointed with myself and I’m using his face for my imaginary dartboard.

Throughout the year after I bought the stock it kept falling and Eric confesses one day on BNN that he had sold the stock since his last visit. It’s like your wife telling you she loves you to death and 5 months later you come home to your bed sheets that hold the smell of a musky man.

Another stock that would have broken my new rule: Would I tell my friend to buy it? I definitely would not have. Maybe this serves me right for investing in a company that fracks. By the looks of the chart the only thing the company is drilling for is zero.

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Bad Stock Pick #2: LGC Capital(LG.V)

This one is the most embarrassing stock pick of them all. A classic penny stock pump & dump. At first I thought of this stock as such but they had some interesting projects, and then a reputable guy in the cannabis stock industry had some semi-supportive words for this company. This same guy had also been picking many winners that I had missed so I thought I found my guy. It’s very possible this guy was paid by LGC to mention some supportive words in an article because I don’t think any professional would semi-recommend this company for free.

The stock went from $0.12 to $1 then it fell like diarrhea — fast and disgustingly. I caught the falling piece of shit at $0.50. Once again, after having cashed out some big profits I became loose with my money. It fell back to $0.12 in no time.

Lessons

  • Don’t catch a falling knife especially if it has shit all over it. A falling blue chip stock ain’t so bad.
  • In a volatile hot industry it’s best to stick with the leaders.
  • 50% off a penny stock is not a great deal.
  • a CFA designation and a nice suit don’t mean shit much of the time.

I’m not sure if this stock is a lost cause but I’m going to have to quadruple from where it is to get back to even. I’ll cut my losses if I get 3/4 of my money back.

Would I have told my friends to buy it? Hell no. I should have asked myself that before I pulled the trigger.

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Bad Stock Pick #1: Grande West Transportation(BUS.V)

Grande-West

When you’re barely out of the sophomore gates of investing you will make some rookie mistakes. After selling some marijuana stock that I made a nice profit on I became a little loose with my money. A few guys on BNN had no negative things to say about this one stock that had dropped 30% in recent months.

Without any good reason other than listening to so-called experts in suits, I bought stock in Grande West Transportation, a bus manufacturer in Canada. From $2.15 it kept falling steadily and is now trading at $0.95.

Lessons

  • Be careful with listening to the ‘experts.’
  • If a stock is falling for unknown reasons especially a largely unknown stock then there might be something you don’t know.

The company knew that it would not build and sell the number of buses that they said they would. Of course, people on the inside and close to the inside knew about this long before it would be made public. This was probably why the stock was falling.

It’s not a lost cause but the stock now needs to more than double for me to get back to even.

My Personal Opinion

  • Don’t bother with these small caps when you don’t have a good enough understanding of the industry.
  • Ask yourself before you buy a stock how you will feel if the stock goes down and you have to hold it.
  • Before buying any stock would you tell your friends and family to buy it?

 

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Buy, Sell or Hold Canopy Growth?

Marijuana stocks are all the rage lately although second to Bitcoin if I had to guess. Everyone I talk to has heard of Bitcoin but not Canopy Growth.

I’ve been a shareholder of Canopy Growth since the $2.75 range, and have sold almost half my shares on the way up. Some people say this was the smart thing to do but the numbers say otherwise. Every time it doubles I think to myself, there’s no way it can go much higher, and then it does. Now I just don’t know what to think anymore.

Most of the professional investors including Warren Buffett would tell me to get out completely but then again if I listened to them I wouldn’t have bought this stock in the first place.

What you will always hear is that Canopy Growth and all the other marijuana stocks are overvalued. They definitely are in conventional terms. Amazon though has been overvalued since 1997 and Netflix is always overvalued as well. $1000 of Amazon stock at its IPO is now worth over $1,000,000.

It’s easy to make a judgement on existing numbers and the short-term future but it’s much more difficult for most people to see what the longer-term future holds. Once the future becomes the present though it all makes sense.

The following is an excerpt from an article written by the CEO of Netflix 8 years ago regarding short interest in the company.

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You can replace “Netflix” with “Canopy Growth” and it would seem appropriate. As of right now Canopy Growth seems to be doing all the right things and would be the horse to bet on. I believe in the company and my only doubt is that shit happens. I realize Canopy Growth is not comparable to Amazon or Netflix in terms of size and market but the situation is similar — market leader in a huge new industry.

“Diversification is for idiots.”

Mark Cuban said this in a video interview. He also added that diversifying will diversify your profits away. Warren Buffett said, “diversification is protection against ignorance.”

If your priority is to see a modest return on your investment in the long term then you should diversify. If your goal is to make a large return in a relatively short amount of time then diversifying will likely not get you there.

Conventional investing advice has a way of altering your perception. People who would gasp at your 1 stock portfolio would at the same time congratulate you on investing your life savings in a new business venture — go for your dreams! Putting it all into your one business is the same as putting it all on one stock. Most people would have been better off putting their money with Jeff Bezos than whatever costly venture they got themselves into.

Diversifying is recommended for every stock portfolio while the status-quo for everything else is to put all of your eggs in one basket. Who diversifies their education? How often do you get the advice to diversify your girlfriends?

I’m not recommending that everyone have a 5 stock portfolio. Warren Buffett also said 99% of people should just invest in an index fund. Most people aren’t skilled or lucky enough though to come out victorious in the stock market without diversification.

Investing Snobbery

snob

Many financial bloggers and professional investors have a bias against speculative investing. Speculating is not investing it’s gambling, they say.

Gambling is going to the roulette table and hoping you hit the 1 in 36 odds of winning without any reason other than hope or I have a good feeling. Speculating is making an educated decision based on the information available, your knowledge and life experience.

If you had put $1000 into Amazon stock at the IPO you would have over $1,000,000 today. Even $1000 ten years ago would now be over $20,000. You won’t get those kinds of returns in 30 years from buying the index or through blue chip dividend stocks. That’s just the reality.

Since the beginning of time the one who was able to see further into the future with better accuracy has always been valuable. Picking successful speculative stocks or even blue-chip stocks is a play on being able to predict the future better than others. Some people believed online shopping was going to be a thing and others didn’t. People will never put their credit card information online! It’s not likely you’ll have a good understanding of multiple industries but once in awhile something comes along that might be in your field of competency.

The majority of people are really good at following conventional rules and only being able to see what’s in front of their face. To them, if a stock doesn’t meet the criteria of being under 25x P/E and having several years of profit then it’s not worth looking at — if the company’s vision is not producing the numbers yet then it’s garbage. Home Depot was a speculative stock until it wasn’t.

It’s not fair to give the advice to never buy speculative stocks. Saying speculating is not investing is just semantics. It comes down to a matter of risk vs reward. You have to be careful though and know your limitations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do You Really Need a Financial Adviser?

The other week while I was walking my dog I asked a woman I sort of know if she was into the stock market. She said that she wasn’t and that she just puts her money into mutual funds. “Then you are in the stock market,” I said.

It made me realize that many if not most people are okay with the idea of having money in the stock market, they’re just not comfortable with managing their own money. Having it managed professionally gives them comfort.

That guy or gal at your bank signing you up into one of their mutual funds is not an expert in the financial markets. If they were so much smarter than you in the markets they would be sitting on a beach instead of their crumby office. They’re salespeople. They get a commission and their company gets a 1-2% cut from your whole investment every year, win or lose. Easy money. In return you might make money but most of all you get the comfort of believing you’re doing what’s right.

Going through my bank’s list of mutual funds I found that the one with the highest 10 year return and lowest fee was a S&P 500 Index fund. They won’t ever push this fund though because it’s not very actively managed if at all since it just follows an index. In order to justify their 1-2% fee they have to make it seem like they’re doing something even if it means actively losing your money. 1% doesn’t sound like much but it really adds up.

I suggested to this woman that a low cost S&P 500 ETF would probably have much lower fees and a better return and that she should check the annual returns of her current mutual fund and compare.

“Nope, no, I don’t want to deal with it. I don’t know anything about that stuff,” she said. This is why financial advisers even exist. When people see their mutual fund tank or languish they don’t want to blame themselves and be confused on what to do.

The truth is you don’t have to know anything. You start a trading account and periodically put money into a Vanguard or Spyder ETF. It’s easier than online shopping.